Friday, November 26, 2010

Thankfully Reading Weekend: Mini Challenge #1

 Jenn of Jenn's Bookshelves is hosting a mini challenge as part of the Thankfully Reading Weekend. So far, I've finished one book (Bait by Alex Sanchez) and have a good start on another (Chasing Windmills by Catherine Ryan Hyde) for this reading challenge.  Off to a good start, time to play a little!

For mini challenge number one, Jenn is asking readers to choose a book that they are thankful for. While there are so very many books that I could choose, I am going to go with my first thought. It's the Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins.


I've read thousands of YA books at this point in my life. As a teacher, there are few books every year that warrant the effort of going through the school board approval process and the fight for funding to order books. It is a complicated and (typically) frustrating process. But, the second I started to read Suzanne Collins's the Hunger Games about three years ago, I knew that needed to teach it.

Not every book is a great read-aloud book. Not every book should be taught to a whole class of students. Not every book needs to be written into the curriculum. This one does.

I have never had students so interested in reading as I have with this series. I teach students who are considered to be "at-risk". Often, this label comes with a lack of reading ability and interest. But, this series seems to appeal to every reader that I've ever taught it to. And, I've taught it for three school years now.

It is so amazing as a teacher of reluctant, disaffected students to get kids laughing out loud, gasping, crying out in the middle of class, predicting plot twists, and begging for me to keep reading. It feels so very good. Even when my throat is sore, they urge me on. I love it.

No matter how upset some book bloggers have been at the progression of this series, I can never say a bad word against Ms. Collins. She has made my students love books and love reading. To me, this is something spectacular and amazing. I didn't know that I would ever find a universal read. Lucky for me, there are three engaging, well-written books that I know I can give to any student. Thanks Ms. Collins. You rock the most!

12 comments:

  1. awesome pick to be thankful for! I am thankful for it too - it's such a guaranteed book to recommend that pretty much will appeal to readers of all ages and sex.

    have a blast reading this weekend!

    x

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  2. All I ever hear about this one is "You have to read this!" But I'm glad to have read this particular post, because it sounds like the perfect gateway into reading for my younger brother. Thanks!

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  3. I loved The Hunger Games too. It's one of the best dystopian YA I have read in a long time.

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  4. Great post! We should all be grateful for The Hunger Games

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  5. I agree! There is so much packed into the HUNGER GAMES, so much that needs to be taught & talked about!

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  6. Excellent pick - and I'm so glad you're teaching it to your students!

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  7. Hunger Games is another great pick for this mini-challenge!

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  8. I've heard many people rave about this series. I don't read much YA these days myself, but maybe when my niece gets closer to this stage we can check it out together.

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  9. One of these days I'll read The Hunger Games and I'm pretty sure I'll like the books.

    Anything that gets young people to read can't be bad.

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  10. YAY for getting typical non-readers interested in a book!!

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  11. I have not read these books yet but they are on my someday list. Any book that gets young kids reading and discussing must be pretty good.

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